Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
os:amigaos:start [2020/08/02 12:37]
127.0.0.1 external edit
os:amigaos:start [2020/08/08 08:07] (current)
muaddib [AmigaOS on the Vampire]
Line 6: Line 6:
  
 The Vampire is compatible with all AmigaOS versions intended for 68k Amigas, from 1.1 to 3.9.  Of course, to get the most modern features and maximum compatibility with Vampire components, you should use the latest version, which is 3.9.  If you do not have access to 3.9, you could try 3.5, 3.1.4 or 3.1 as well. The Vampire is compatible with all AmigaOS versions intended for 68k Amigas, from 1.1 to 3.9.  Of course, to get the most modern features and maximum compatibility with Vampire components, you should use the latest version, which is 3.9.  If you do not have access to 3.9, you could try 3.5, 3.1.4 or 3.1 as well.
 +
 +<callout type="​tip"​ icon="​true">​
 +By today'​s standards, AmigaOS is a tiny, barebones OS.  It is extremely fast, but even the latest version lacks many modern features and the appropriate configuration to run optimally on modern hardware like the Vampire. ​ Therefore, installing a powerful, ready-to-use distribution on top of AmigaOS is strongly recommended. ​ The most polished distribution for the Vampire is [[https://​www.amikit.amiga.sk/​vampire|AmiKit XE]].
 +</​callout>​
 +
 +===== Kickstart conventions =====
  
 In classic Amigas, the bootstrap firmware (Kickstart) is stored in ROM. The Kickstart contains many core components of AmigaOS, such as the kernel, the windowing environment,​ basic DOS functionality and critical drivers. Its purpose is to initialize the hardware and boot from disk. Because the Kickstart is stored in ROM, its functionality is available immediately at power-on, without having to load anything from disk. If the user needs any AmigaOS components that are not included in the Kickstart, then they need to be loaded from disk. In classic Amigas, the bootstrap firmware (Kickstart) is stored in ROM. The Kickstart contains many core components of AmigaOS, such as the kernel, the windowing environment,​ basic DOS functionality and critical drivers. Its purpose is to initialize the hardware and boot from disk. Because the Kickstart is stored in ROM, its functionality is available immediately at power-on, without having to load anything from disk. If the user needs any AmigaOS components that are not included in the Kickstart, then they need to be loaded from disk.
Line 23: Line 29:
 If your boot partition is not within the first 4 GB of the hard disk, then you need to use a Kickstart that contains an updated ''​scsi.device''​. Kickstart 3.1.4 and Cloanto'​s Kickstart 3.X contain such an updated ''​scsi.device''​. If your boot partition is not within the first 4 GB of the hard disk, then you need to use a Kickstart that contains an updated ''​scsi.device''​. Kickstart 3.1.4 and Cloanto'​s Kickstart 3.X contain such an updated ''​scsi.device''​.
 </​callout>​ </​callout>​
 +
 +----
  
   * [[.v3.9|Special considerations for AmigaOS 3.5 and AmigaOS 3.9]]   * [[.v3.9|Special considerations for AmigaOS 3.5 and AmigaOS 3.9]]
Last modified: le 2020/08/02 12:37